Past Articles

Vincent Park, The Oldest Park in Redondo Beach
By Kathy McLeod
In Redondo Beach, lies a small, uniquely-designed park that is steeped in our city’s rich history. The park’s “one-of-a-kind design” eventually shaped the surrounding streets and blocks of the city and is a beautiful example of historic park design.
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San Pedro Road Trip
By John Reilly
Have you ever felt you needed to get away from it all but didn’t have more than a day to spare? Recently, a friend and I wanted to get away, if only for an afternoon. We pointed the car south in search of something interesting and out of the ordinary. We found it in a place not too far away, San Pedro.
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TIKE KARAVAS: At The Museum
By John Reilly
Constantine “Tike” Karavas welcomes visitors to the Redondo Beach Historical Museum, gives tours on request, and shares his deep knowledge of local history, often adding a bit of fun sports trivia. Those who visit the Museum leave with a new-found appreciation of the beautiful and historic seaside town of Redondo Beach.
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Bungalow Courts: Designed For California Living
By Dennis Sullivan
Around 1909, a new concept in temporary dwellings started an architectural style that continues to this day, the bungalow court. The new style of these courts ranged from Spanish Colonial Revival to Swiss Chalet. They all shared the basic design of cottages arranged around a courtyard. Builders found that they could keep the California garden setting so popular with bungalow homebuilders while reducing land costs by using the court plan.
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Red Cars: All That’s Old Is New Again
By Wayne Knutson
It is the rare Redondoan indeed who, trapped in a seemingly endless “Sigalert” traffic jam on the freeway, has not longed for an alternative to these bumper-to-bumper automotive nightmares. If he or she is a Southern Californian of longstanding, fifty-years-old at a minimum, their thoughts may well turn to the legendary “Red Cars” of the Pacific Electric Railway. These electrified interurbans dominated local transportation for nearly half a century, and many can wax lyrical about the low cost, speed; fifty minutes from Redondo to downtown Los Angeles; and, perhaps most amazingly, the geographic reach of these trains. From the Redondo train station, located where the Redondo Beach Elks Club now stands, one could travel as far east as Redlands, north to the San Fernando Valley or south to Newport Beach and never have to turn a wheel, stomp a break or inhale the exhaust fumes of an idling diesel.
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Preservation Gets a Boost, Landmark Owners Get a Break
By Dennis Sullivan
The Mills Act legislation allows cities and counties to contract with landmark property owners as an incentive toward historical preservation and, when necessary, to restore and rehabilitate their property to conform to the rules and regulations of various state and federal agencies.
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Redondo Beach Teams Up with the State, County and
Homeowners to Save Landmarks and Taxes
Reducing property taxes for any property owner in Redondo Beach seems at odds with the normal revenue raising mission of city goverment. But, that is just what the city has done by offering the Mills Act Tax Plan to the city’s landmark property owners. The city’s Planning Department runs the program and recently Teresa Gianos, associate planner, answered some questions for our newsletter.
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Where Did The “Old Heart” of Redondo Beach Go?
By Wayne Knutson
Skirmishes over the creation of a new commercial and residential hub for Redondo Beach–the “Heart of the City” plan–filled local newspapers during 2002, but this battle was by no means unique in the history of the city. Some 38 years previous, the city council and a group of concerned citizens waged an eerily similar contest over a proposal for “urban renewal,” and it was the council’s victory, and the eventual destruction of the old downtown, that helped set the stage for the most recent political struggle.
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Researching Your Home’s Past
By Dennis Sullivan
When was your house built? When did the garage get added? Who was the first owner? You’re sure it’s a bungalow but is it California or Craftsman? Being the owner of an historic home presents a great opportunity to dig into the past. Most of us buy our historic home without any detail knowledge of its history. At some point, we become curious and start looking for information that will build a better understanding of our house and its part in Redondo Beach’s past.
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Fire Insurance Maps Provide City Snapshots
Fire insurance maps are detailed city plans, usually at scales of 50 or 100 feet to an inch. They show individual building “footprints,” complete with construction details.
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The Colorful Story of Malibu Tile
By Ellan Allen
Malibu Potteries was just one of several local tile companies that put California on the map in the 1920s. Redondo Beach students examined this rich art through a unique educational program.
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